Brendan<div><br></div><div>there is a perennial tension between maintaining any commons (data included) and enclosure. Your FAQ glosses over a fundamental issue for the future of the Net by presenting it as a matter of personal preference between anti-commercialism or simply wanting to give a gift. </div>
<div><br></div><div>Your are right to point at the exchange contributed value for computing and storage resources, but this is the same model used by Facebook, wand FB gets a lot more in the bargain. There are many people looking at true sustainability and just governance of systems based on peer produced value:</div>
<div><br></div><div><a href="http://www.digital-commons.net">http://www.digital-commons.net</a></div><div><br></div><div>Although SA clauses are problematic for data, this is similar to the GPL/Apache debates in software, where it&#39;s clear that it goes both ways and the debate is not closed: there are some entrepreneurs that suffer as they cannot reach some markets because of viral licenses, AND there is lock-in by companies of the contributed value of people. </div>
<div><br></div><div>In the creative industries people are struggling with similar issues of sustainability and how different licenses affect business models for derivative works</div><div><br></div><div><a href="http://fcforum.net">http://fcforum.net</a></div>
<div><br></div><div>but there, the focus is how can artists both share their work and survive the Net that takes everything and doesn&#39;t want to pay. The same question form the perspective of the Media Industry is how to control the flows via DRM and repressive laws (DEA, HADOPI...).</div>
<div><br></div><div>With Open Government Data the question is how can Governments keep producing free high quality data, and avoid having to spend a fortune buying data services back from private companies, while at the same time encouraging innovation and entrepreneurship. The UK is facing -- and ducking -- this very issue right now with the Public Data Corporation. </div>
<div><br></div><div>Unless we start talking less about licensing and more about things like corporate taxes, fiscal fairness and societal benefits, we are just postulating a common interest between citizens, business and the state, instead if actually constructing it. </div>
<div><br></div><div><a href="http://turbulence.org.uk/turbulence-5/capitalist-commons/">http://turbulence.org.uk/turbulence-5/capitalist-commons/</a></div><div><br></div><div>Please don&#39;t take this personally. In a way, what is truly viral in the open data networks is the spread of memes about licensing!</div>
<div><br></div><div>Javier<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On 17 September 2011 11:10, Brendan Morley <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:morb@beagle.com.au">morb@beagle.com.au</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
Stef,<br>
<br>
I feel limited in my reply because I&#39;m not clear what your &quot;criteria for success&quot; are here.  I expect they are different to mine.<div class="im"><br>
<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
i beg to disagree you can in fact be an innovator and honor the SA.<br>
<br>
   <br>
</blockquote></div>
Agreed, you *can* be an innovator under SA.  But not insisting on SA is a greater incentive for innovators / entrepreneurs.<br>
<br>
With SA, innovations tend to only happen as a result of people scratching their own itches.<br>
Without SA, innovations also tend to happen as a result of people seeing the opportunity to make some cash.<br>
<br>
As a consumer, I&#39;d prefer to have innovations come thicker and faster, even if it means spending more cash to get it earlier.<br>
<br>
<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
nope, [SA] only keeps the data free and prohibits the privatization of the<div class="im"><br>
commons. which i&#39;d say that&#39;s not innovation but robbery.<br>
<br>
   <br>
</div></blockquote>
Making a copy of something is not robbery, we worked that out long ago in the debates about music piracy.  A commercial operator can produce a value added work without withdrawing CC By material from the commons.<div class="im">
<br>
<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
(After all, the<br>
author itself doesn&#39;t *have* to SA, only the downstream users!)<br>
     <br>
</blockquote>
so the one creating value should not have privileges?<br>
   <br>
</blockquote></div>
They can if they want, but the original question here was around the default licence a *city* (i.e. government) should release under.  I don&#39;t know why a city should keep privileges from its citizens, including the option for those citizens to commercialise and seek a business opportunity from that commercialisation.<div class="im">
<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
depends on liberally licensed works as contributions (i.e. CC By and<br>
public domain), but in turn it also allows full geodata<br>
roundtripping between government-crowd-commercial.<br>
     <br>
</blockquote>
how can you ensure roundripping back from commercial to crowd and gov without<br>
an SA licence? or do you mean with roundtripping gov-crowd-corporatelockin?<br>
   <br>
</blockquote></div>
I used the word &quot;allows&quot;, not &quot;ensure&quot;.  No, I can&#39;t ensure the trip back from commercial.  But it is not lockin either.  Commercial operators cannot lock-in any IP greater than their own IP.<div class="im">
<br>
<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
Other references: <a href="http://www.ausgoal.gov.au/the-ausgoal-licence-suite" target="_blank">http://www.ausgoal.gov.au/the-<u></u>ausgoal-licence-suite</a> -<br>
&quot;Among those, the Creative Commons Attribution Licence (CC BY) [...]<br>
provides the greatest opportunities for re-use of information&quot;<br>
     <br>
</blockquote>
i&#39;d like to see the study that is the foundation for this statement.<br>
   <br>
</blockquote></div>
I hope some of my statements above give some illumination.  But others on this list may have ready access to chapter and verse.  To me it&#39;s simple.  The less additional clauses there are to a licence, the less people will be scared off by it.<br>

<br>
A more practical example:  Many western governments (at least .au, .us, .ca., .uk) cannot re-use contributions into OpenStreetMap (strong SA geodata).  Dropping SA allows re-use in this scenario.<br><font color="#888888">
<br>
<br>
Brendan</font><div><div></div><div class="h5"><br>
<br>
<br>
______________________________<u></u>_________________<br>
open-government mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:open-government@lists.okfn.org" target="_blank">open-government@lists.okfn.org</a><br>
<a href="http://lists.okfn.org/mailman/listinfo/open-government" target="_blank">http://lists.okfn.org/mailman/<u></u>listinfo/open-government</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br></div>